Recent Entries


Life dawns for an elephant

Edited by Keri Harvey

It was when the sun saluted the earth that we started our early morning drive, but stopped soon afterwards to soak up the colours of sunrise close to Southern Camp. As we watched the new day dawn, helmeted guinea fowl darted past, calling: “Such good luck, such good luuuuuck. Good luck!” Or that’s what it sounded like.

We were slowly driving on towards the river when the tracker spotted fresh elephant spoor. But before we could finish chatting about the circular tracks of the animal, we heard the elephant herd nearby. They had gathered on the sandy banks of the Klaserie River, which cuts through Kapama, and the tracker motioned me to keep going in that direction.

Elephant calf at Kapama

Elephant calf at Kapama

As we drew closer, we saw the herd wasn’t on the move. Instead, all the senior cows were standing still and looking at us. We were momentarily confused. Then one younger cow started straining her body and leaned heavily against a jackalberry tree, as if borrowing strength from it. As she turned, a flood of warm fluid burst from her rear, washing and cleansing her flanks while she held her breath. The effort caused her tail to rise and, at that moment, there was a deluge of steaming liquid that accompanied the amniotic sac. It contained four slippery truncated legs, an elongated tubular nose and a rotund little body. The large ears seemed glued to the side of its perfect head, and in a single movement her calf plunged onto the river bank. Cautiously, with her right front foot, the cow touched the motionless calf still cocooned in its birth sack. The calf kicked its tiny feet in response and all the elephants present gathered around to welcome the newborn baby to the world.

As the young mother moved slightly forward, it was an opportunity for us to take rare photos of an elephant calf just a minute old. But the matriarch was unimpressed with us. She drew close to us and shook her head as a sign of her disapproval, so we retreated out of respect and gratitude for witnessing the miracle of new life.

As we moved, a yellow-brown tree squirrel edged out cautiously from between the jackalberry trees. The tiny animal’s long, bushy tail flicked nervously as it searched for seeds from the tree. He picked up a single seed and held it in both front feet, as if praying. It was at the same moment that an African fish eagle also announced his presence in this wilderness theatre and applauded: “God bless them! God bless them! God bless them all!” I don’t believe it wasn’t our imaginations, but an auspicious bushveld welcome for the newborn elephant calf.

Written by: Betheul Sithole, Southern Camp ranger

Enjoyed this? Please share...Print this pageEmail this to someoneShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Silent procession of marchers

Processionary worms

Processionary worms

Recently, an American family of four were my guests at Kapama Karula. Their two daughters were aged six and 10 years old, and when I asked who had special interests, I was told that Chloe, the six-year-old, loved caterpillars. She loved them so much that whenever she found a worm or caterpillar, she would name it.

I told her about processionary worms, but that they were more active in summer and the rainy season. I promised I’d do my best to find some worms for her to see while we were out on game drive. It was a beautiful warm afternoon in the bush when I spotted a hairy chain on the ground. The worms were going, well, who knows where – but they were all going together, joined in a single line head to tail. It’s really an unusual sight.

Processionary worms

Processionary worms

Chloe couldn’t wait to get out of the vehicle to take a closer look at these interesting creatures. Before long, we were all on our hands and knees looking at the long line of worms and taking photos. Colly Mohlabine even had to pose next to the worms, so that Chloe could prove to her friends back home that this happened on a real safari. I think Chloe would definitely have chosen to see the caterpillars long before the Big Five, and I don’t think a line of caterpillars has ever been showered with so much attention.

These creatures are actually the caterpillars of the processionary moth, a very gregarious species that lives in community on food plants. Whenever they need to move to another tree, the worms join together head to tail and move in procession – like a thick silk thread. The procession can be metres long, and is thought to be a defence mechanism, because the line of worms looks more like a snake or stick. Predators such as birds are less keen to attack such an imposing line of caterpillars. So the principle of ‘safety in numbers’ works for caterpillars too, not only herds of wildlife.

Written and photographed by Collen Mokoena, Kapama Karula ranger
Edited by Keri Harvey

Enjoyed this? Please share...Print this pageEmail this to someoneShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Giraffe stand-off

Hyena in the grass

Hyena in the grass

On an early morning game drive out of River Lodge, Lot Makhubele spotted the clear tracks of a male leopard imprinted in the sand road. He slowly climbed down from his high seat at the front of the vehicle and started explaining to guests the difference between male and female leopard tracks. The male leopard’s tracks are bigger and the shape is slightly rounder than that of the female. Male leopards are always solitary so there’s only one set of tracks, whereas there are often cub tracks close to the tracks of female leopards. Guests were amazed that Lot Makhubele could tell the sex of an animal just from its tracks, but he really can.

For about a half an hour we followed the leopard tracks, until he turned off the road and into the bush. It was inaccessible to us in a vehicle, and I was still explaining this to guests when Lot Makhubele spotted a female giraffe staring down at the ground. It may not sound significant at first, but giraffes usually stare fixedly at one place when they have seen a predator. So we were excited at the possibilities.

As we drew nearer, we found a clan of about 10 hyenas lying in the grass staring back at the female giraffe. Then, to our amazement, we saw a baby giraffe lying dead at its mother’s feet. It appeared the young giraffe had died during the previous night, and its mother was protecting its body from the encroaching hyenas. As the hyenas moved closer, the giraffe fended them off. They hung back for a few minutes and began slowing approaching again. And so it went on for at least an hour. The giraffe stood her ground and we eventually left the sighting.

On returning an hour later, the giraffe was still guarding the body of her baby from the hungry hyenas, and it’s possible she had stood there doing this all night before. However, when we returned the next morning, there was no sign of the event. Not a single bone of the baby giraffe or a shred of evidence remained.

Hyenas have a bad reputation, but are essential in the ecosystem and keep the bush clear of carrion. They are unusual and interesting animals, so it’s no surprise there are also plenty of myths and superstitions about them. It was previously thought that hyenas are hermaphrodites, but it turns out they are not. What is true is that female hyenas are heavier than males, more aggressive and socially dominant. Two pups are usually born to a litter and they are born ready for action – with their eyes open and canine teeth developed. So no time is wasted of keeping the bush clear of carcasses.

Story by Clement Kgatla – Ranger at River Lodge
Edited by Keri Harvey

Enjoyed this? Please share...Print this pageEmail this to someoneShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Cheetah wins the race

Buffalo Camp is aptly named. On a recent game walk, we set out after breakfast heading for the dam near Buffalo Camp – because buffalo had been spotted there. En route, we saw various different birds and interesting animal tracks, and also heard the buffalo.

We moved in the direction of the sound, and there they were: a herd of about 60 buffalo, calmly drinking water. They had no idea we were watching them, because both the wind and the sun camouflaged us from sight and scent. After taking all the photos we wanted, we left; the buffalo still had no idea we’d been in their midst.

Walking back to camp, I heard vervet monkeys give an alarm call quite close to where we were standing. There was rumour of a predator in the area, so I scanned the bush to see if I could spot one. No luck though, because the grass was long and provided perfect camouflage for them. But the monkeys had spotted it already.

We continued walking back to camp, hopped onto a game-viewing vehicle and headed out to search for what the monkeys had seen. It didn’t take us very long to find the prize. Sitting on top of a termite mound, looking regal, was a young female cheetah. I had never seen her before on the reserve, so this was a special sighting already.

She sat there quite calmly, sniffing the air every so often. That’s what cats do when they’re on the hunt. They can literally smell their next meal. After about 20 minutes, she got up and started walking towards a dry dam nearby. Now out of the long grass and walking down the sand road, the young cheetah continued to sniff the air. Not even a minute later, she lay down in the road. She’d spotted an impala ram about 80 metres away. He was in mortal danger and didn’t even know it. Instead, he continued browsing, tree to tree, believing he was perfectly safe.

The cheetah, crouched low, started stalking the impala and got to 20 metres from him before she was spotted. He ran and she gave chase, running right past our vehicle in the scurry. She ran the impala towards a nearby gully. He slipped and fell. Then quickly got up again. But the cheetah was too quick. She tapped the impala on the back and managed to pull him down. Immediately she went for the throat to suffocate the animal. Very quickly it was all over.

Before starting her meal, the cheetah seemed to pose for photos alongside her prize. Once she’d caught her breath, she was ready to feed. So we left her to enjoy her brunch – and noted another amazing day at the ‘office’.

Written and photographed by Almero Klingenberg – Buffalo Camp
Edited by Keri Harvey

Enjoyed this? Please share...Print this pageEmail this to someoneShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
Recent Comments
  • Shannon: Oh my soul! We arrive on Thursday and I'm counting the sleep...
  • Elaine Ahlberg: Thanks so much for this story; just makes me miss being ther...
  • MORIN Marie Catherine: Merci de nous faire partager ces moments d'exception...
  • Annemieke Dean: Thank you so much for the wonderful blogs. They bring back t...
  • avril van den Bosch: Wow!! amazing sight, wish i was there!! Proudly SA...
  • Bill middleton: Fantastic, can't wait to get there, see you on the 23rd June...
  • Karin: a Very interesting article. These birds are really something...
  • Andrew chamberlain: I was on this game drive! Amazing sighting and absolutely br...
  • Karsten Kemp: These impressive and majestic birds I saw first time in Keny...
  • Krish: Fascinating read! Thanks for sharing. Cheers, Krish...
  • Karsten Kemp: Yes, that was rather unusual animal to meet. And you have be...
  • Paul: Awesome! Great reading about the experiences and thanks for ...
  • Marty Dover: What time of year are they in this larval stage?...
  • Karsten Kemp: Both the story about the bushbaby and the lion versus hyenas...
  • Jenny Alphandary: Lovely read Johan. Our group from Australia enjoyed River Lo...
  • Marty Dover: How very fortunate you are! I wonder why the bush baby did n...
  • Chris Cartwright: ALWAYS WILL REMEMBER OUR STAY AT CAMP IN 2010. Fantastic ...
  • Marty Dover: Jacques, I'm so glad you had that experience and envious tha...
  • Sally: I find your newsletter, photographs & stories amazing. ...
  • Jane K. Buchsbaum: I was a visitor to fabulous Kapama 9 years ago and loved eve...